Skip to main content

*LET'S LEARN* *WORDS FREQUENTLY USED IN NIGERIA NOT FOUND IN THE DICTIONARY*




1. *Installmentally:*
This “word” is a favourite of many Nigerians, but, sadly, it simply does not exist. You won’t find it any reputable dictionary. The correct thing to say when “installmentally” comes to your mind is in _"instalments"_ or _"by instalments"_.

*2. Plumpy:*
Nigerians use _“plumpy”_ when they want to say that someone is chubby or slightly fat. The correct expression is _plump_.

3. *Disvirgin:*
This particular “word” is used severally on a daily basis, especially by Nigerian men when they intend saying that a woman has lost her virginity to a guy. The correct word to use, however, is _"deflower"_, because “disvirgin” is not a word.

4. *Crosscarpeting:*
This is a favourite of Nigerian politicians and political analysts alike. They use it when they want to say that a politician has dumped his political party for another party, usually a rival party. The right terms to use when describing this scenario are _"party switching"_, _"defection"_ and _"crossing the floor"_ and not “cross-carpeting” or “crosscarpeting.”

5. *Go-Slow :*
The word go-slow exists, but not in the way Nigerians use it. A “go-slow,” in the peculiarly Nigerian context, is a situation in which road traffic is very sluggish due to vehicle queues. However, go-slow in the English language actually means _"an industrial tactic used by employees whereby they intentionally reduce activity, productivity and efficiency in order to press home some demands"_. When this happens, you say that work in the office, factory or organization is at a go-slow. The correct terms to use when road traffic is very sluggish due to vehicle queues are _"traffic jam"_, _"traffic congestion"_, _"gridlock"_, and (less technically) _"hold-up"_, not “go-slow.”

“Cunny” is not found in authoritative dictionaries, but it can be found in some slang dictionaries. Over there, it is a slang used to refer to a woman’s private part. The correct term to use is _"cunning"_ (which is used to describe someone that is being deceitful or crafty) and not “cunny.”

7. *Opportuned:*
There is nothing like “opportuned” anywhere in the English language, but that has not stopped its blatant use by all and sundry in Nigeria, including journalists and writers. The correct word is _"opportune"_. The word opportune is an adjective; therefore it has no past tense. An adjective has no past tense. However, some verbs can function as adjectives or adverbs in a sentence. These verbs are called participles and they do have past tenses. They are not pure adjectives. Examples of participles are fattened, amused, disgusted, mystified, overwhelmed, upset and bored. Be that as it may, opportune is a pure adjective and not a participle, therefore it has no past tense. Opportune means appropriate or well-timed.

8. *Alright:*
“Alright” is a misspelling of the term _"all right"_. All right is used when you want to say that something is adequate, acceptable, agreeable or suitable. To hardcore English language linguists, “alright” is not a word. However, its usage is gaining traction and it’s increasingly becoming acceptable. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary – which is considered the gold standard among American English speakers – has recently drawn a lot of criticisms for its permissiveness when it began indexing some otherwise colloquial and street language terms, including “alright.” Most linguists disagree with the gradual acceptance of “alright” as a word by the public and even the media, while those in the minority are “alright with it.

“Wake-keeping” exists only in the imagination of a few English speakers. As a matter of fact, there is no such thing as “wake-keeping.” The correct word is _"wake"_ and not even “wake-keep.” Both “wake-keeping” and “wake-keep” are ungrammatical.

10. *Screentouch:*
This bad grammatical expression gained currency in Nigeria and neighbouring West African countries with the influx of made-in-China

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Check NYSC Senate Approved List of All Institutions for the 2017 Batch ‘B’

National Youth Service Corps, NYSC senate list is out. The portal for verifying the senate approved mobilization list (2017 Batch ‘B’) of various institutions in Nigeria is live.
This is to inform all prospective corps members (2017 Batch ‘B’) that they can now check the senate approved mobilization list of their various institutions on the National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) portal for free.
See also: NYSC Batch ‘B’ Mobilization Exercise Timetable – 2017
HOW TO CHECK NYSC SENATE APPROVED LIST. 1. Go to NYSC senate list portal at https://portal.nysc.org.ng/nysc2/VerifySenateLists.aspx 2. Select your Institution. 3. Supply your Matriculation Number and Surname in the required columns. 4. Select your date of birth. Finally, click the ‘SEARCH’ button to access your mobilization status.

Scary News About Your Cellphone

File photo

The war rages on about the safety of cell phones.  One side argues there’s either nothing to fear, while the other warns that your phone is causes grave harm when it comes into close contact with your body. Citing the views of other experts Dr Joseph Mercola tries to show where the real truth lies.

The year 2014 marked the first time in history that there were officially more mobile devices than people in the world – approximately 7.2 billion.

Although significantly lower, the number of cell phone users is forecast to reach 4.77 billion by the year 2017.

That’s a lot of cell phones and cell phone users. But what’s even more fascinating about all these mobile devices is the behaviour that surrounds them: The average cellphone owner checks their phone 110 times a day, or about nine times each hour; and 46 percent of smartphone owners say “they couldn’t live without” their phones

Cell Phone Safety

Most…

Nigerian Navy commences recruitment of graduates

The Nigerian Navy has commenced the process for the recruitment of suitably qualified Nigerian graduates through the Nigerian Navy Direct Short Service Commission (DSSC) Course 25.
The guidelines for the enlistment can be accessed on the Nigerian Navy Enlistment Portal http://www.joinnigeriannavy.com/ which will be opened on October 11 for interested candidates to apply online.
Interested applicants, who must be Nigerians by birth, should possess a minimum of Second Class Upper Division for first degree holders and Upper Credit for HND holders. Male applicants must not be less than 1.68 metres tall while female applicants must not be less than 1.65 metres in height. Applicants should be between 22 and 28 years by 31 January 2018, except for Imams and Chaplains who should not exceed 30 years by January 31, 2017.